Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Are we there yet?

24 December 2013

For those parents out there they will be familiar with the cry from the backseat of the car on a big journey, “Are we there yet?” Much like children Project managers have a need to know how far we have to go and more importantly are we there yet i.e. can I mark your task as complete.

Setting out on a journey from Melbourne to Sydney it is pretty easy to know how long the journey will take and more importantly how you are progressing and a fair idea of your estimated time of arrival.

Let’s say you were one of the early explorers and didn’t have a specific destination in mind nor an idea of the terrain between you and where you were heading. Pretty hard to know how long your journey will take or how you are progressing.

Solution Architecture can sometimes be like the early explorer scenario. It usually comes down to how many unknowns there are in the problem space you are working in. Stop and think about that for a tick the length of your journey is proportional to the number of unknowns. So if I can identify all the unknowns there are I will know how big the problem is and a rough idea how long it will take to solve.

Image

This introduces one of my favourite concepts which are known unknowns. Now the first step isn’t to turn the unknowns into knowns but just to identify there is something you don’t know the answer to. A good way to track this is to group these unknowns. You can group them into problem spaces or along functional lines depending on the type of solution you are developing.

This grouping of the solution provides a good way to communicate progress of the design activity. This can be expressed as two components:

  1. Unknowns that I have discovered (Known Unknowns)
  2. A gauge of how many unknowns you think you have discovered i.e. a percentage or traffic lights (red, amber, green)

Just be aware that the role of the Solution Architect isn’t to identify every unknown and it isn’t to turn every unknown into a known.

Known Unknows well these are the points where you do your best work. If you deem the unknown to be architecturally significant you need to get down and turn the unknown into a known and find a solution. If the unknown isn’t architecturally significant at this level of design then you just capture it but don’t need to solve it.

Unknown Unknowns well you don’t know. Looking at your solution there is a cloud of unknowns surrounding it, it is just there. You need to assess all the areas of your solution and look for weak spots, areas that the unknowns can penetrate and invalidate your solution. At these points you can do one of two things

  1. You either do some more investigating and identify the unknown
  2. Or you put a risk or assumption that underpins your design decision. Kind of like an unknown force-field.

So how does that sound as a way of venturing where no Solution Architect has ever ventured before? Pretty simple really isn’t it. Identify the unknowns that will impact you solution. Turn the important unknowns into knowns and find solutions for them. How easy could it be? Now try and get a Project Manager to put those tasks into a project schedule.

Good Luck!

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On “Geek” Versus “Nerd”

30 July 2013

Slackpropagation

To many people, “geek” and “nerd” are synonyms, but in fact they are a little different. Consider the phrase “sports geek” — an occasional substitute for “jock” and perhaps the arch-rival of a “nerd” in high-school folklore. If “geek” and “nerd” are synonyms, then “sports geek” might be an oxymoron. (Furthermore, “sports nerd” either doesn’t compute or means something else.)

In my mind, “geek” and “nerd” are related, but capture different dimensions of an intense dedication to a subject:

  • geek – An enthusiast of a particular topic or field. Geeks are “collection” oriented, gathering facts and mementos related to their subject of interest. They are obsessed with the newest, coolest, trendiest things that their subject has to offer.
  • nerd – A studious intellectual, although again of a particular topic or field. Nerds are “achievement” oriented, and focus their efforts on acquiring knowledge and skill over trivia and memorabilia.

Or, to…

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Mentoring

30 July 2013

I hope I haven’t had this impact on the people I have mentored?

 

Mentoring

Project Management Triangle

30 July 2013

The Project Management Triangle is one of my favourite models that I find myself drawing on many occasions. As an architect you are constantly having scope discussions and while at an architecture level it may be OK it impacts time and/or budget which may not be satisfactory. This is a simple and effective way to explain why:

Project Management Triangle

Architecture Debt

14 December 2012

I have had the idea of Architecture Debt on my mind of late, most designs have something in there that you could class as Architecture Debt. Mmmmmmmm

We are different

26 May 2011

A great post on how people being different can make simple tasks complex if not impossible.

http://www.avioconsulting.com/blog/bdean/2011/03/24/jury-duty-facilitation

Good enough for Einstein

18 March 2011

One of Einstein’s colleagues asked him for his telephone number one day. Einstein reached for a telephone directory and looked it up. “You don’t remember your own number?” the man asked, startled.” No,” Einstein answered. “Why should I memorize something I can so easily get from a book?”

In this day of Google do you need to memorise anything?

Sorry Server

19 January 2011

What else would you call the Server that manages your 404 and other HTTP errors but the Sorry Server

Australian Cricket

11 January 2011

Q. What is the height of optimism?
A. An Australian batsman putting on sunscreen.

Q. What is the main function of the Australian Coach?
A. To transport the Team from the hotel to the ground.

Q. Why don’t Australian fielders need pre-tour travel injections?
A. Because they never catch anything.

Q. What’s the Australian version of LBW?
A. Lost, Beaten and Walloped.

Q. What do you call an Australian with 100 runs against his name?
A. A bowler.

Q. What’s the most proficient form of footwork displayed by Ponting?
A. The walk back to the pavilion.

Q. Who has the easiest job in the Australian squad?
A. The guy who removes the red ball marks from the bats.

Q. What do Australian batsmen and drug addicts have in common?
A. Both spend most of their time wondering where their next score will come from.

Q. Why are Australian cricketers cleverer than Houdini?
A. Because they can get out without even trying.

Q. What does Ryan Harris put in his hands to make sure the next ball almost always takes a wicket?
A. A bat

Migration Summary

7 January 2011

Over the last couple of weeks I have put together some of my key learning’s from the last nine month, leading the architecture team on a migration project. There were a lot of firsts in this project for me, both from the problem space of the project but also leading a relatively large architecture team. This has been a good change to reflect on the project and take some time to capture these learnings.

By three methods we may learn wisdom: First, by reflection, which is noblest; Second, by imitation, which is easiest; and third by experience, which is the bitterest.
Confucius

Leading a team of architects presented several challenges one simple problem of having multiple architects but one architecture to document. A simple habit that the team got into which helped develop a culture of knowledge sharing was the Architecture Review Meeting. At the core of the whole project we developing a Reference Architecture to tie everything back to. Last but not least, we used a technique from the agile world called the retrospective to provide a bit of continuous improvement as we moved from one part of the project to the next.

Doing a migration project was challenging, from the start is seemed that migration is just ETL. As the project evolved we soon realised that a migration is much more than ETL. We had to tackle several problems such as migrating a large volume of data. The importance but also the frustration of having to define what would happen on the day. By looking at other migration projects we came across a technique of defaulting rather than exception.

What a journey!